ESL Debate.

What is a debate?

What is the difference between a debate and an argument?

When are debates used and what for?

Have you ever watched or taken part in a debate?

Topics for Debate.

https://englishpost.org/debate-topics-esl-classroom/

https://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/socstud/frame_found_sr2/tns/tn-13.pdf

the first speaker on the affirmative team presents arguments in support of the resolution.
(5 – 10 minutes)
• The first speaker on the opposing team presents arguments opposing the resolution.
(5 – 10 minutes)
• The second speaker on the affirmative team presents further arguments in support of the
resolution, identifies areas of conflict, and answers questions that may have been raised
by the opposition speaker. (5 – 10 minutes)
• The second speaker on the opposing team presents further arguments against the
resolution, identifies further areas of conflict, and answers questions that may have been
raised by the previous affirmative speaker. (5 – 10 minutes)
• The rules may include a short recess for teams to prepare their rebuttals. (5 minutes)
• The opposing team begins with the rebuttal, attempting to defend the opposing arguments
and to defeat the supporting arguments without adding any new information.
(3 – 5 minutes)
• First rebuttal of the affirmative team (3 – 5 minutes)
• Each team gets a second rebuttal for closing statements with the affirmative team having
the last opportunity to speak. (3 – 5 minutes each)
• There cannot be any interruptions. Speakers must wait their turns. The teacher may need
to enforce the rules.

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